Posts Tagged ‘avoiding bad hires’

Tips on Avoiding Bad Hires

February 15th, 2013
With advances in technology, human resources managers and recruiters have access to streamlined methods to locate and recruit potential job applicants. However, almost half of all new employees are not meeting the requirements of their jobs in the first year and half of employment, according to data from hiring managers reported in research carried out by Leadership IQ.
The hiring system is failing, according to a recent article in Business Insider, which cites statistics showing that a bad hiring decision can cost an organization from 20 percent to 200 percent of an employee’s annual salary. What’s more, bad hires result in lowered office morale and hinder productivity. Once bad hires get involved in office politics, it can be more difficult to fire them.
The problems only get deeper: workers who see their top managers making mistakes in hiring people can lose respect for the company and its procedures. They may wonder if the company has lowered its standards or if hiring managers are just asleep at the wheel.
Recruitment and applicant tracking systems certainly have made it far easier to manage a tidal wave of hopeful job candidates.  Recruiters and HR personnel should always still be aware that hiring is a constantly evolving space. Old methods employed by hiring managers may not work as well anymore to truly secure the best talent in any given industry. While harnessing the latest trends, like social media, can be benificial to finding promising candidates, empoloyers need to make sure that there is room for human judgment as well through all stages of finding new hires.
Savvy job seeks may employ less than truthful tacticts if they are desperate to get a foot in the door at your HR department. Software helps disorganized applicants churn out stellar-looking resumes.  However, aspiring workers can hire a resume consultant to bolster their appearance with the latest keywords that HR departments use to help them select which resumes are worth looking at and which ones are destined for the garbage can.
Once a manager has a set of resumes to examine in-depth, the filtering process may have problems. Some HR workers, frazzled by the workload they face, may select applicants at random from the stack of “good” resumes instead of evaluating each one on its merits. Or, even if they do take time to give each filtered resume a fair shake, they might focus on past experience rather than seeing which applicants can think on their feet and solve problems during an interview.
It’s also important to remember that extroverted people tend to do better in interviews, and a biased interviewer may not see that a less gregarious person is far more qualified for a position. If you are going to use keywords to filter resumes, make sure that you aren’t accidentally omitting terms that you do want to see. For example, using only the word “manager” might keep you from seeing a narrative resume that talks about how a person managed people or worked in management.
Once human resources managers and recruiters recognize the need to change the way they discover, filter and evaluate job applicants to fill key positions in their organizations, they will be well on their way to limiting the amount of bad hires they make.  This requires both utilizing the best technology available to filter incoming applicants, as well as employing savvy hiring managers to make integral decisions when required.

avoid hiring bad employeesWith advances in technology, employers have access to streamlined methods to locate and recruit potential job applicants. However, almost half of all new employees are not meeting the requirements of their jobs in the first year and half of employment, according to data from hiring managers reported in research carried out by Leadership IQ.

The hiring system is failing, according to a recent article in Business Insider, which cites statistics showing that a bad hiring decision can cost an organization from 20 percent to 200 percent of an employee’s annual salary. What’s more, bad hires result in lowered office morale and hinder productivity. Once bad hires get involved in office politics, it can be more difficult to fire them.

The problems only get deeper: workers who see their top managers making mistakes in hiring people can lose respect for the company and its procedures. They may wonder if the company has lowered its standards or if hiring managers are just asleep at the wheel.

Recruitment and applicant tracking systems certainly have made it far easier to manage a tidal wave of hopeful job candidates. Recruiters and hiring Managers should always be aware that hiring is a constantly evolving space. Old methods employed by hiring managers may not work as well anymore to truly secure the best talent in any given industry. While harnessing the latest trends, like social media, can certainly be beneficial to find promising candidates, employers also need to make sure that there is room for good old fashioned human judgment through all stages of finding new hires.

It’s good to keep in mind savvy job seeks may employ less than truthful tactics if they are desperate to get a foot in the door at your HR department. Certain resume software solutions can help disorganized applicants churn out stellar-looking resumes.  Job seekers can also hire a resume consultant to bolster their appearance with the latest keywords that HR departments use to help them select which resumes are worth looking at and which ones are destined for the garbage can.

Once a manager has a set of resumes to examine in-depth, the filtering process may also have problems. Some hiring managers, frazzled by the workload they face, may select applicants at random from the stack of “good” resumes instead of evaluating each one on its own merits. Or, even if they do take time to give each filtered resume a fair shake, they might focus on past experience rather than seeing which applicants can think on their feet and solve problems during an interview.

It’s also important to remember that extroverted people tend to do better in interviews, and a biased interviewer may not see that a less gregarious person is far more qualified for a position. If you are going to use keywords to filter resumes, make sure that you aren’t accidentally omitting terms that you do want to see. For example, using only the word “manager” might keep you from seeing a narrative resume that talks about how a person managed people or worked in management.

Once hiring managers and recruiters recognize the need to constantly evolve the way they discover, filter and evaluate job applicants, they will be well on their way to limiting the amount of bad hires they make.  This requires both utilizing the best technology available to find and filter incoming applicants, as well as employing savvy hiring managers to make integral decisions when required.