Archive for February, 2013

Dice Rolls into the Candidate Sourcing Tool Market with Open Web

February 19th, 2013

Last week, Dice, the leading career site for technology and engineering professionals, rolled into the candidate sourcing tool market with Open Web, a recruiting tool that allows users to search approximately 50 social and professional networks and billions of web pages to create an aggregated or “super” profile of a candidate’s professional experience. Very similar to TalentBin and Entelo, Open Web from Dice allows recruiters to search for candidates with desired skills and experience across the web from one interface. The profile aggregation functionality pulls together the disparate pieces of information from across the web so recruiters can easily put together a meaningful story about candidates. “Open Web not only pulls in information about candidates’ professional experiences but also about their interests making it a valuable tool for collecting the underpinnings that contribute to assessing cultural fit,” said Jeff Winter, a professional recruiter and General Manager at technology search firm Gravity People in San Francisco.

Screenshot from Infoworld

Screenshot from Infoworld

Open Web is likely just the first roll for Dice. There are rumors that the tech job advertising leader is currently testing technology that will allow recruiting firms and employers to use the Open Web technology to update their candidate databases with the most current profiles of past job applicants. This could be another great tool for recruiters and employers that are constantly sourcing high-demand passive candidates. And, if that’s not enough, Dice promises to release a professional-facing tool that will enable tech professionals to view and interact with their Open Web profile as recruiters and employers see it.

The Hiring Sciences Hunch

Historically, Dice has been a strong player in the technology advertisement vertical. Their pricing has always been fair and their reputation is as good as, if not better, than any traditional job boards in the business. The release of Open Web starts the latest chapter for Dice, expanding their footprint into the white hot sourcing tools space. We don’t think Open Web is a big gamble. Dice has a unique advantage that can’t be overlooked. They’ve been active in the recruitment market for over 20 years. They understand their users and their buying trends. This is not just a group of smart engineers and fresh MBAs sitting around room guessing what recruiters do all day. These guys have seen the market evolve for 2 decades and they are jumping in the game with lots of chips.

Our hunch is that Dice with their significant customer base and brand recognition has a strong opportunity to run the table in the sourcing tools category. Their entry in this space will certainly create competition for smaller vendors with fewer offerings and little brand recognition. Open Web also gives recruiters a good alternative to LinkedIn which has created some negative equity recently with it’s aggressive sales tactics and high prices.

For more information about Open Web, contact dice: http://www.dice.com/

“Hiring managers visit many places in their search for candidates with the right skills and experience for their open positions.  In today’s social grid, that’s a big dig – consuming a lot of time putting together disparate pieces of information from across the web,” said Scot Melland, Chairman, President and CEO of Dice Holdings, Inc.  “Now, Open Web makes it easy by consolidating all kinds of valuable, public information about technology candidates in one place.  In a few seconds, employers get unique profiles with real depth allowing both an understanding of the candidates’ qualifications and how to approach tech professionals on a more personal, direct level.

Tips on Avoiding Bad Hires

February 15th, 2013
With advances in technology, human resources managers and recruiters have access to streamlined methods to locate and recruit potential job applicants. However, almost half of all new employees are not meeting the requirements of their jobs in the first year and half of employment, according to data from hiring managers reported in research carried out by Leadership IQ.
The hiring system is failing, according to a recent article in Business Insider, which cites statistics showing that a bad hiring decision can cost an organization from 20 percent to 200 percent of an employee’s annual salary. What’s more, bad hires result in lowered office morale and hinder productivity. Once bad hires get involved in office politics, it can be more difficult to fire them.
The problems only get deeper: workers who see their top managers making mistakes in hiring people can lose respect for the company and its procedures. They may wonder if the company has lowered its standards or if hiring managers are just asleep at the wheel.
Recruitment and applicant tracking systems certainly have made it far easier to manage a tidal wave of hopeful job candidates.  Recruiters and HR personnel should always still be aware that hiring is a constantly evolving space. Old methods employed by hiring managers may not work as well anymore to truly secure the best talent in any given industry. While harnessing the latest trends, like social media, can be benificial to finding promising candidates, empoloyers need to make sure that there is room for human judgment as well through all stages of finding new hires.
Savvy job seeks may employ less than truthful tacticts if they are desperate to get a foot in the door at your HR department. Software helps disorganized applicants churn out stellar-looking resumes.  However, aspiring workers can hire a resume consultant to bolster their appearance with the latest keywords that HR departments use to help them select which resumes are worth looking at and which ones are destined for the garbage can.
Once a manager has a set of resumes to examine in-depth, the filtering process may have problems. Some HR workers, frazzled by the workload they face, may select applicants at random from the stack of “good” resumes instead of evaluating each one on its merits. Or, even if they do take time to give each filtered resume a fair shake, they might focus on past experience rather than seeing which applicants can think on their feet and solve problems during an interview.
It’s also important to remember that extroverted people tend to do better in interviews, and a biased interviewer may not see that a less gregarious person is far more qualified for a position. If you are going to use keywords to filter resumes, make sure that you aren’t accidentally omitting terms that you do want to see. For example, using only the word “manager” might keep you from seeing a narrative resume that talks about how a person managed people or worked in management.
Once human resources managers and recruiters recognize the need to change the way they discover, filter and evaluate job applicants to fill key positions in their organizations, they will be well on their way to limiting the amount of bad hires they make.  This requires both utilizing the best technology available to filter incoming applicants, as well as employing savvy hiring managers to make integral decisions when required.

avoid hiring bad employeesWith advances in technology, employers have access to streamlined methods to locate and recruit potential job applicants. However, almost half of all new employees are not meeting the requirements of their jobs in the first year and half of employment, according to data from hiring managers reported in research carried out by Leadership IQ.

The hiring system is failing, according to a recent article in Business Insider, which cites statistics showing that a bad hiring decision can cost an organization from 20 percent to 200 percent of an employee’s annual salary. What’s more, bad hires result in lowered office morale and hinder productivity. Once bad hires get involved in office politics, it can be more difficult to fire them.

The problems only get deeper: workers who see their top managers making mistakes in hiring people can lose respect for the company and its procedures. They may wonder if the company has lowered its standards or if hiring managers are just asleep at the wheel.

Recruitment and applicant tracking systems certainly have made it far easier to manage a tidal wave of hopeful job candidates. Recruiters and hiring Managers should always be aware that hiring is a constantly evolving space. Old methods employed by hiring managers may not work as well anymore to truly secure the best talent in any given industry. While harnessing the latest trends, like social media, can certainly be beneficial to find promising candidates, employers also need to make sure that there is room for good old fashioned human judgment through all stages of finding new hires.

It’s good to keep in mind savvy job seeks may employ less than truthful tactics if they are desperate to get a foot in the door at your HR department. Certain resume software solutions can help disorganized applicants churn out stellar-looking resumes.  Job seekers can also hire a resume consultant to bolster their appearance with the latest keywords that HR departments use to help them select which resumes are worth looking at and which ones are destined for the garbage can.

Once a manager has a set of resumes to examine in-depth, the filtering process may also have problems. Some hiring managers, frazzled by the workload they face, may select applicants at random from the stack of “good” resumes instead of evaluating each one on its own merits. Or, even if they do take time to give each filtered resume a fair shake, they might focus on past experience rather than seeing which applicants can think on their feet and solve problems during an interview.

It’s also important to remember that extroverted people tend to do better in interviews, and a biased interviewer may not see that a less gregarious person is far more qualified for a position. If you are going to use keywords to filter resumes, make sure that you aren’t accidentally omitting terms that you do want to see. For example, using only the word “manager” might keep you from seeing a narrative resume that talks about how a person managed people or worked in management.

Once hiring managers and recruiters recognize the need to constantly evolve the way they discover, filter and evaluate job applicants, they will be well on their way to limiting the amount of bad hires they make.  This requires both utilizing the best technology available to find and filter incoming applicants, as well as employing savvy hiring managers to make integral decisions when required.

JobLark, Joins the Flock of Employee Referral Tools

February 4th, 2013

JobLark joins the growing flock of employee referral management products that have landed in the market over the past 18 months. Very similar to Zao, Goood Job, Sticky, Select Minds (Oracle) and dozens more Joblark leverages social networks to enable referrers to discover and refer job applicants. And like Zao, Joblark also allows employers to track and reward all the people that help make successful hires, whether they work for the employer or not. Joblark (like Zao) makes money by charging a fee once a hire is made.

Headquartered in Utah, JobLark appears to have around twenty or so employees and claims to have taken 1 million dollars in funding with 9 million more committed by Apple Tree Capital. Not much else is known about the company, the management team or active customers.

The Hiring Sciences Hunch

The employee referral management space is white hot but the space is getting crowded. The editors here at Hiring Sciences agree that ERM is an interesting niche in the HR Tech landscape but the window may be closing quickly for small upstarts like JobLark. Competition from applicant tracking software vendors, many of which already offer integrated employee referral management modules, will force standalone solutions like JobLark to focus on smaller employers with smaller budgets. Also, user adoption will pose challenges for the likes of JobLark as employees are inundated with tools and a standalone ERM solution may not carry the weight of other more mission critical systems. Overall, we believe the ERM space is very interesting and solutions like JobLark are making great use of social networks but it’s still unclear if a majority of employers are ready to adopt these new standalone tools.

If you are interested in learning more about JobLark visit the site at https://www.joblark.com/

Recruiter Roles are Evolving with Technology and Social Media

February 1st, 2013

Social Media Recruiting TechnologiesFacebook’s value to recruiters as a tool for discovering promising new job candidates will get a boost now that the social networking behemoth has announced the release of its new Graph Search feature.

Graph Search, currently available in a limited beta program for testing, is a search engine running inside of Facebook. It is designed to let ordinary Facebook users find answers to queries such as, “French restaurants in San Francisco my friends have eaten at” or “videos of my friends’ birthday parties.”

Savvy recruiters know that they have to keep up with developments in technology and social media if they want to find the best candidates for the positions they are trying to fill. Sites such as Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn and Twitter offer a treasure trove of information about potential candidates. They enable employers and recruiters to follow connections as they search for professionals to fill important positions.

Facebook’s Graph Search should provide value to recruiters because it will enable them to search the social network for candidates who have  profiles that align with employer needs, according to Work4Labs CEO Stephane Le Viet’s recent guest post, “Graph Search And Online Recruiting: How Facebook Is Transforming An Industry,” at Forbes magazine.

Le Viet notes, for example, that the Hard Rock Cafe could use Graph Search to help it fill positions in a new Tokyo outlet by targeting Tokyo residents who have said they like rock music.

Facebook’s value to recruiters becomes even more evident when you consider that you can focus on specific keywords and dive deeper into data about the candidates you discover. The recruiter will see details about the candidate’s education, job history and what motivates and interests them, Le Viet says, without necessarily having to even review a resume.

As potential job candidates spend more of their time on sites like Facebook, it makes sense to look for them there.  This is where there personas, skills and interests are truly on display.  If the open position relies on the candidate being tech savvy, checking up on how they present themselves via online profiles can be very demonstrative to their abilities.  For example, you can see how helpful  or knowledgeable a candidate is as he offers (admittedly self-serving) advice to people via Twitter or by posting comments on someone’s Facebook page.

It is a sure thing that social networks such as Facebook will change the way that you look for and recruit job candidates. Users are connected to  one another in ways they they may not even realize, such as through shared interests or people in common. This may lead a discerning recruiter to discover candidates who are friends with people already working at the company and whose interests and skills line up with the requirements of the position.  It is integral that those at the front lines of recruiting keep up with the latest web technologies – in particular the big social media platforms like Facebook.